Home > Games, Marketing, marketing to women > Super Bowl and Courting Women Viewers

Super Bowl and Courting Women Viewers

This week Nielsen reported on the record numbers of African American, Hispanic and female viewers that helped propel this year’s  Super Bowl XLV to become the most-watched television program of all time. This year’s Super Bowl (111,4 million viewers)  surpassed the ATH set by last year’s Super Bowl (106.5 million viewers) as the  most watched TV program in U.S. history and kicked the leading final episode of M*A*S*H (105.5 million viewers in 1983) off the top.

Part of this success came from the increasing amount of Hispanic and African American viewers. This year about 10 million Hispanics watched the game (surpassing last year’s figure was 8.3 million viewers) while 12.5 million African American tuned in as well (surpassing last year’s figure of 11.2 million).

Part of this success came from the increasing amount of female viewers that Super Bowl XLV attracted. According to Nielsen, about 51.2 million female viewers watched Sunday’s game, compared to 48.5 million female viewers last year, meaning that we are closing in on a 50% – 50% split in gender now for the viewers of Super Bowl spectacle, even if it still continues to be dominated by male viewers.

Just like so many other industries (gambling and casual games especially) the sports industry has started looking towards women and ethnic groups when trying to grow their viewer numbers.

As previously reported by Nielsen, more American women watch the NFL than any other team sport, and not just the Super Bowl.  The NFL (regular season) has by now surpassed Major League Baseball and the National Basketball Association in percentage of female viewers, to a large extent thanks to the extensive investment in various marketing ploys catering to the female viewer.

One can only hope that the slightly embarrassing female targeted version of ESPN,  ESPNW will soon start picking up on some of these “radical” marketing techniques (coaching clinics, apparel that fits women…) that seem to have worked for NFL.

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